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Full text of "Acorn"

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VOLUTIO 



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"Oakwood is a Cut 

and perspectiver 

one language... 



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who we are alone, together we are 
Oakwood." 



of a 



Revolution. 



The Art of friendship, determination, 
speech, selflessness, and love. 









' "True art is made noble and religious by the mind 
producing it. For those who feel it, nothing makes the heart 
, more religious and pure as the endevour to create 
something perfect. For God is perfection and whoever 
strives after it strives after something divine." 



Michaelangelo 



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Photography by: Henry Chaney 
(Destiny Art) 



Revolution 



10 



An Ime 



Revolution 



22 



A Coopepatme Revolution 



44 



An UmI 



Revolution 



62 



A Cpeafwe Revolution 



112 



A Physical Revolution 



The 



Exhibit 



Underclassman 

Graduates 

MAPS 



136 



176 



acmfu & 



226 



Completion of a Course the period made by t*^e 
regular succession of a measure of time or by a 
succession of similar events 

Sudden, radical or complete Chanqe in t^e way of 

thinking. 

Activity or Klovement designed to effect 
fundamental Changes in the socioeconomic situation 



W 



e are not confined to just one definition of t^e 
word: rather we have chosen to encompass all t'^at it *-as 
to offer. This revolution is a neccessary chanqp we ^ope 
will affect not only our lives but the lives of anyone God 
puts on our path. 

This revolution is the promise of an inevitable c*^ange, 
the reality of a long ournev nearing its end, and t^e 
possibilty of a future we will have created for ourselves. 

We are artists. We have come here to master t^e art of 
dedication, friendship, intellect, speecha and Love.Ti-is 
ability to create is something God entrusted to us. I *"ope 
this book represents You as an artists that it serves as an 
exposition, reminding You of any moment You composed 
in the process of this campaign. 

I hoped you participated in this evolution, t^at You 
fully experience what is displayed in this book and to feel 
the emotions that lay between its' pages. However, f-is 
exhibit will attempt to showcase our revuiu:iuf and we 
hope it does it justice. Enjoy every page and be 
mesmerized by every moment frozen and framed for you. 
by you. 



Photograph bj^rMa^hew-Lee Morgan 



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President Pollard 



Get Ready for a Revolution!!! 

I want to charge our Oakwood University students to get ready for a revolution!!! A 
revolution is a fundamental change in the way a society thinks and operates. A 
revolution is an upheaval of the social order. A revolution is a fundamental 
reallocation of political and social power. In every generation, a revolution is just 
around the corner of our status-quo thinking. George Washington, first President of 
the United States, led the American Revolution of 1776. In 1789, the French 
Revolution of July 14, 1789 forever altered the French social and political landscape 
when the Bastille was stormed and France s way of life was forever changed. In 1804, 
Toussaint L Overture led the Haitian Revolution. A nation of former African slaves, 
desiring only their freedom and dignity, withstood the mighty French army to establish 
the first Black independent nation in the Western Hemisphere. Vive la Haiti!!! Vive la 
democratic II! 

Today, as I listen to your heart-cry, Oakwood University students also stand on the 
cusp of a revolution. But yours is not simply a political revolution. No, it goes way 
beyond that. My assessment of your generation of Oakwood students is that yours 
will be a revolution of love that will land on the shores of our cities and churches in a 
tsunami of service. Everything in our LifeCore research indicates that your 
generation is radically committed to service to your communities. You have no plans 
to leave Oakwood and settle into a complacent blandness. No, you will be different. 
Connected to God, concerned about others, anointed and appointed, you will make a 
grand difference wherever you plant your roots. But how will you get there? You have 
already told us. 

During our 2011 LifeCore research project conducted here at Oakwood University, 
when we asked you about what you were committed to, 83% of the 834 of you who 
completed the 52 item questionnaire said that you were either committed or 
decidedly committed to "Using the Bible as God's revealed word, authoritative for 
truth and guidance. " This is a remarkable finding. Many had written your generation 
off as incurably laissez faire, but you told us that you are submissive to God s ultimate 
authority. This Bible makes the most radical claim on the lifestyleone can choose. 
This means that for you God First will be the north star of your life. Your decisions 
will reflect this commitment to the exciting journey of a living foUowership of and 
fellowship with God. That commitment to revolutionary living will take some of you to 
mission lands afar on different continents and countries. For others, this radical 
commitment will take you to urban settings in your homeland. But whether far or 
near, you will impact your communities with the transforming love of Christ. You will 
realize the truth that if God be for you, who can be against you (Romans 8:31 \ You 
will know the power of the truth that if the Son makes you free, you shall be free 
indeed (John 8:36). 

So get ready for a revolution a revolution of love, a revolution of power, a 
revolution of faith, and a revolution of hope. And in the words of one of the original 
spoken word artists of the 1970s, the revolution will not be televised. This was his 
way of saying that spectators should not expect to experience and participate in the 
revolution. We will not be able to watch the revolution from the comfort of our living 
rooms. This revolution of love will produce a personal engagement with God and God s 
people. Now, go out and make that difference. 

Leslie N. Pollard, Ph.D., D.Min., MBA 




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A Spiritual Eevolution 

The art of worship, dedication, faith and strength 





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What do you get when you gather 
tomorrow's leaders, thinkers, 
proffessionals,artists, and athletes 
together to take a true stand 
against satan and put on display the 

POWER OF THE RISEN ChRIST? YoU GET 

A TRUE WORSHIP < V i»[^ UM' vr '!<; You 

GET MINISTRIES THAT ARE NEW, CUTTING 
EDGE, AND SPEAK TO YOU LONG AFTER 
THE SERMONS HAVE STOPPED. YoU GET 
STUDENTS AND MINISTIRES THAT DON't 
JUST PREACH TO YOU BUT PRAY AND 
TALK WITH YOU. You GET AN ARMY OF 
YOUNG MEN AND WOMEN RIGHTLY 
TRAINED TO TAKE ON HUNTSVILLE AND 
THE ENTIRE WORLD FOR ChRIST's 
NAMESAKE. 



Lets be honest, as soon as we 
stepped foot on campus this year 
we knew something was different 
and let me give it a name: 



KIAOIJ n 



I PRAISE God FOR 



ALLOWING ME THE OPPROTUNITY TO 
SERVE OaKWOOD THIS YEAR. I REALIZE 

NOW THAT God dosen't put you 
into a position just so you can 
CHANCtE the world, but to firsi 

CHANGE YOU. It's ONLY THROUGH 
THAT CHANGE THAT WE ARE ABLE TO 
AFFECT OTHERS. So TO CHRIST, 
THANKS FOR THE REVOLUTION, I KNOM 
IT WILL CONTINUE AS LONG AS WE 

HAVE YOU. This year as and years 



TO COME WILL 



AS A 



TESTIMONY TO YOUR GOODNESS. 



BragOnHim 

Galatians 6:9 



BELL TOWER 



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Take The City ; Outreach To 
THE NEXT Level The student 

BODY OF OaKWOOD IS NOT ONLY 
FOCUSED ON CREATING 
ON THE CAMPUS BUT IN THE ENTIRE 
CITY OF HUNTSVILLE ALABAMA. 

Downtown Rescue Mission, 

Harris Home for Children and 

Huntsville Hopsital for Women 

and Children are areas that are 

beinc touched by the Love of 

Christ! 



"V.O.LC.E. V.O.LC.E. stands for 

Visualizing Our Inner 

Connection to Emmanuel and is a 

ministry that has taken Oakwood 

by storm. This interactive 

worship experience stri\'es to 

through the means of the 

CREATn E arts. DRvVMA, POETRY AND 

ART ARE THE AVENUES THAT ARE 

USED. 



QHKNTIN EXERHTIT 
i:s.M Rku(;ioi s Vice .fii» 




The Art of Determination 

I was sitting on my bed. completely 
discouraged, I'd just found out that I 
had failed the Yaounde School of 
medicine entry exam. It has always 
been the school I wanted to attend, 
there and then, I thought my world 
was falling apart. 

In Cameroon where I am from, one 
can directly attend medical school 
after high school after passing a 
grueling entry exam. I was an 
excellent student in high school and 
everyone believed I would do well. I 
also knew of the reality that was 
inherent to the procedure of 
admission, the one of secretively 
depositing a huge amount of money 
to the officials to make sure that 
even if you do not do well on the test 
you would still get in. 

I went to take the test anyway 
trusting that God would allow me to 
get in without the money I did not 
have to give. The results came like an 
earthquake and I did not know what 
to do next. 



" As I left She told 
me to trust God . " 



Determined not to take a year off, I 
went to the state university to study 
biology. Interestingly enough, the first 
part of the biology curriculum 
required two years of geology and I 
hated the idea that I would have to 
study rocks all that time. So I dropped 
out of the university for a whole year. 
My mother who always believed in 
me did ever3rthing she could to give 
m.e the opportunity to back in school. 
Through a conversation with my 
uncle, I heard of Oakwood College and 
was thrilled at the idea of applying 
there, which I did and was accepted 3 
months later! 

I was excited and full of hope for 
the future as I boarded the plane 
bound for the United States. In my 
hands were the $1240 that my 
mother borrowed for me and as I 
left she told me to trust God . The 
money I had received from my 
mother was found to be very 
insignificant to pay for a semester 
of school fees. I had nowhere to stay 
and something told to call my uncle. 
I told him that I could not pay for 
that semester and wondered if he 
could help. To my surprise he said 
he could but that would be the first 
and the last time. 



14 



Of course, the following 
semesters were not promised to be 
as glamorous as the first and I 
faced the hardest times of my life. 
With nobody but God to help me, it 
was promiised to be trying. One 
night at the very beginning of a 
semiester, I had nowhere to stay 
because I could not financially clear 
and it was very cold. I was glad to 
find a room at Edwards Hall that 
was empty and entered in to spend 
the night. Nearly hours after I fell 
asleep an RA woke me up informing 
me that I was not supposed to be in 
there and that I had to exit the 
premises. It was about 3 am and I 
had no idea where to go. I gathered 
my things and waited outside until 
morning. 

I fell into deep depression and as 
time went on, I wanted out of 
existence. It was halfway through 
that semester, my student visa status 
was in jeopardy and I had no idea 
where the sum of nearly $14,000 
was going to come from. So one night 
I decided to go and kill myself, by 
drinking bleach. As I was getting 
ready to perform that last act, I 
heard a clear voice asking me why I 
would want to kill myself when this 
whole situation was about to come to 
an end. I was terrified, dropped the 
bottle and ran to my friend s room 
where I was illegally staying. 



Immediately I received a phone 
call from a lady who happened to live 
in Prance, a lady I did not know. She 
asked for my student ID number and 
started putting money on my bill 
until it was paid off! God showed me 
that He cared. The Lord found v/ays 
for me to pay for all the other 
semesters. He touched many of my 
friends, people in the Financial Aid 
office and anonymous individuals to 
help me financially and to encourage 
me. I will forever be thankful for 
each of them and they know who 
they are. As I leave , my 

mind will always be full with 
powerful experiences I have made 
with God and to encourage you my 
friend, know that whatever the Lord 
allows you go through He will always 
bring you out! 



" Whatever the Lord allowk 
you go through He will 
always bring you out!" 




Dear Men of Oakwood, 

It probably doesn t seem like it but 
apparently Oakwood is comprised of 43% 
males and 57% females. While it s normal for 
the female population of a college or 
university to outweigh the male population, 
it s not normal (or expected) for the male 
percentage to be so close. Those numbers 
are especially astounding considering this is 
an HBCU. However, everyone knows quantity 
is nothing unless you ve got quality. So we d 
like to take a moment as your sisters, your 
friends, your girlfriends, your future wives, 
and your supporters to recognize and 
commend you. / 



M»B»yS|WW,«*pi»).(s»^ (!,*,<, 



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Your influence on the love 

I revolution this year made a huge 
difference. Your increased presence 
in worship did not go unnoticed. We 
appreciate that you ve taken the 
time to be taught of the Lord as you 
prepare for your academic and 

'professional futures. We hope you 
realize that that is the foremost 

I reason that you re here. Second is 

to serve us 

Just kidding :) 

But in all seriousness, we re not 

'telling you all of this t6 gas you up. 

I It s been said that the way to nurture 
positive action is to acknowledge 

Ithe good that s already been done. 

! Society (along with us, at times) 

'Spends a lot of time talking about 
what yDu can't do, what we see you 
doing wrong, and what you II never 
be able to do right. 




As hype as we get about women s 
rights and such, aside from the obvious 
procreation angle, we need you. You 
guys are an essential and critical part of 
our school, our church, and our 
communities. Your role in this love 
revolution is critical and it s been an 
inspiration watching you grow in Christ 
this year. Never stop chasing after God. 



Love, 



I 



Women of Excellexc i: 



But we see you at worship, 
voices and hands raised in 
praise to your Creator. We see 
you at the altar, surrendering 
your manly pride and inhibitions, 
giving God permission to mold 
and make you into the men He 
intends for you to be. You re 
doing that right. We pray it s not 
just for show. We pray that you 
continue to do so. Set a 
standard of spiritual excellence 
for yourselves and challenge the 
young men coming after you to 
meet an even higher standard. 



Revolution of Technology 













There's an App for that... 



Its a good thing we have decided to use this 

technological epedemic to our advantage. We seldomly 

get the sideways glance these days, when we have our 

phone ' s or smart pads out during scripture reading and 

the sermon. 

How many of us are actually using our bible apps is an 

enitrely different story, we can relesh in the thought 

that no one can prove otherwise. 



Photography by: Henry Chaney 
(Destiny Art) 



"Therefore if any 
man be in Christy he 
is a new creature: 
old things are passec 
away; behold, all 
things are become 








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"Education , therefore , is a 
process of living and not a 
preparation for future^ 



John Dewey 




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Arion Mills 

Photograph by: Michael James 



■ Classification: J unior " ■ 

Maior: P sycholo^/ Elementary Education 
Hometown: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

"I believe a revolution will take place when students realize their true 
personalities and confidently pursue their talents and endeavors." 

How are jon creating a revolution, in your major? 

As president of Psychology Club, I have tried to create a very positive 
environment for students and Psychology Club members in order to create an 
environment that is emotionally supportive as well as one that promotes self- 
confidence. There is a revolution taking place in Psychology Club where the 
officers have created social activities, educational opportunities, and volunteering 
services through Psychology Club for Psychology Majors /Minors or whoever 
wishes to be a part of this organization 
What parts of your major do you enjoy the most? 

One of my favorite parts of Psychology is the deep conversations that occur 
within the Psychology Classroom. It opens my mind in a way that allows me to 
take a different perspective on multiple everyday situations as well psychology- 
based experiences. Another thing I enjoy about my major is reading Psychology- 
based books outside of the classroom explaining different theories about why we 
as humans are the way we are as it relates to the brain. 



some 01 



jssmi moments, oi your me 



Planning my schedule every semester has been difficult as a double major, 
making sure to take the right classes so that I will be able to graduate on time. 
Also, math is a strong challenge for me so those classes were quite difficult but I 
got through them Praise the Lord! 
What/Who is your inspiration? 

My mother is the inspiration of my life. She is my role model. She taught me 
how to never give up, even if you are not good at something. She has done so 
much for me and my 2 older brothers when it wasn't easy and for that I love and 
respect her. 
■ What legacies do you hope- to leave behind? • ■• 

I hope to leave an impactful and encouraging legacy to students who have a 
difficult time in their classes. Giving up is never an option and in this life you 
have to work for everything you want. As long as students can see Christ in the 
legacy that I and my fellow classmates have left behind than that's alright with me. 



Imani Cherry 

Pliotograph by: Dawn Peters 



Clas,slflc»>inn Junior 

Ma,1or: Spanish/International Studies 

Hometown: The world, nah Hagerstown, Maryland lol 

"Revolution is Freedom of Love and the- Freedom to Love. At the core of a 

Revolution is the desire to he free. God has 0ven us free will and he loves us 

freely, without limits. We should try to do the same. " 

How can you inspire a revoiutipn in your majoi'? 

The whole purpose of me being an International studies major, is to open my 
mind and change the way I perceive everything around me. I ultimately want to 
help others do the same. I'm creating a revolution in my major by revolutionizing 
our perceptions. I try to talk to people more about having a free and open mind 
and not limiting how and whom they love. One day I hope I can use my major to 
bridge the gap and create an open space where people can love themselves and 

see God's Love. 

What parts of your major do you enjoy the most? i 

I love how my major as a whole causes me to think deeply about the world 
around me and be informed. I seem to never stop learning new things. I pretty 
much enjoy every aspect of both of my majors. ^^^^ -^^ 

What are some of the most stressful parts of your major"^' 

I think there's so much information to learn about the world it can be a little 
overwhelming at times. I feel like once I learn one thing, I have to turn around 
and learn another, but that's what life is about, a continual learning process. 

What are some battles/ obstacles you've encountered while creating this revolution in 
your field of study? 

Not everyone is on the same page as you are. After coming back from my year 
abroad, I sometimes felt like not everyone is on the sajne wavelength to 
revolutionize themselves and the world around them. It was hard for me to ergoy 
superficial conversations. I encounter the battle of complacency all the time. 

What legacies do you hope to leave behind? 

Honestly I wish to have more people study abroad and I want to encourage 
Oakwood to get more involved in missions. Hopefully by the time I leave, everyone 
will want to travel and work in the mission field, at home and internationally. I 
think it would be awesome to come back to Oakwood and see more students 
involved in missionary-based activities. 






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Spain 







Argentina 



Imagine how you would feel if one day all your textbooks somehow 
changed into a different language that you don't understand and all your 
teachers started teaching you in that language. LOL! Welcome to the life of 
an ACA student; at first. . . 

Let me tell you, an ACA student goes through so many different feelings. 
At first you're excited because you're in a different country that is different , 
fun, and beautiful then you're frustrated because you can barely 
understand anyone and you are often misunderstood. Then you're excited 
because your mind is being opened , you're learning so much about yourself 
and about life in general and then you're upset with yourself because you 
feel like you should be learning faster! You don't even know the 
temperature , your height , or even your weight. I write this to say that ACA 
is not all fun and games. 

The ACA program has changed my life! As clique as this may sound , it's 
true. You see things differently and you question why certain things are 
done the way they are in the states. You see the attitude that America , as a 
whole , portrays to other countries and how it affects them. Last but not 
least you see gorgeous places in the world that you might not have gotten to 
see otherwise. For example, I've seen one of the Seven Natural Wonders of 
South America (Las Cataratas de Iguazu Falls) and I'm going to see two of 
the Seven Wonders of the World (Machu Picho in Peru and Christ the 
Redeemer Statue in Brazil). When you see things like this it proves that 
there is a God who is big , powerful , alive and well , and is more than capable 
to help us in any way we can possibly need Him. I am so glad I decided to 
come here to Argentina and be a part of the ACA program. Ask anyone that 
has been in ACA, there is going to be amazing times and hard times but it is 
an experience of a lifetim.e! 



Un alum.no de ACA , 
Reuel Mclntyre 
Argentina 




31 



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'But every house where Love-abides, 

And Friendship is a guest, 

Is SU mM^MQ ME, AND homesweet-home: 

For there the heart can rest. " 

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Administrative Assistant 



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Special Events Coordinator 




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Stephanie Campbell 
Editor Spreading Oak 



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Public Relations Coordinator 



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Music Coordinators 



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56 





In 1932 , Oakwoodites flocked towards newstands to read Acorn , 
Oakwood's first student-chaired publication. A newspaper, designed to 
be informative and relative , had been created to unite the study body 
through print. Fredrick B. Slater , the editor-in-chief of Volume 1 , must 
have felt liberated at first-sight of the product. Like Slater, I too have 
felt the liberation and reward in producing an innovative and creative 
piece. Nearly a century has passed, and quite a few things have 
changed: new name and various layout alterations. 

Carrying the torch and in conjuction with USM's theme , Love 
Revolution , The Spreading Oak, has once again evolved. Together with 
my vibrant staff, we created a modern and mature blend of magazine 
and newspaper by changing it's size and enhancing it's content. 
Ultimately creating a "newsmag. "There's something suitable for all ages 
and classifications. 

God has richly blessed this publication in the years passed. I can't 
imagine how far He will take it in the years to come. 

P.S. We're even online. Don't believe me? Check it out for yourself. 

Stephanie J. Campbell 
Editor n Chief 



spreading o;ik 




MAPS-MiNORiT\^ Association of Pre-Medical Students 

While interning this past summer at Howard University' Hospital, I was given 

THE OPPORTUNITY' TO ATTEND THE NATIONAL MeDICAL ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE. 

During my time at the conference I was encouraged to form a chapter of the 
Minority Association of Pre-Medical students (MAPS) on Garwood's campus. 
maps is the undergraduate affiliate to the Student National Medical 
Association, and its chapters seek to represent future underrepresented 

MINORITY' medical students. 

Garwood Universit\''s chapter of the Minority- Association of Pre-Medical 
students is dedicated to providing students exposure to healthcare, while also 
committing itself to serving the greater huntsville area through community' 

service EFFORTS. ThIS SCHOOL YEAR ALONE, MAPS HAS WORRED WITH HuNTSVILLE's 

chapter of the national association of american business clubs (ambucs), the 
Autism Research Foundation, and First Stop (a non-profit organization 

DEDICATED TO THE NEEDS OF THE HOMELESS IN HuNTSVILLe). We HAVE ALSO CONDUCTED 
A CLOTHING DRIVE FOR THE HOMELESS, AND HAVE HOSTED A FAIR TO RAISE HEALTH 
AWARENESS AND PROMOTE HEALTHY LIVING. LaSTLY, OUR STUDENTS HAVE ALSO HAD THE 
OPPORTUNITY' TO SHADOW MeDICAL DOCTORS AND DeNTISTS THAT WORR IN THE GREATER 

huntsville area. ' 

Lawrence Brown 
Resident of MAPS 



58 



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GROUNDS, LEARN 



I .GROUNDS, LEARN /. ilMM V^AYS AND VISIT OUr. DEPARTMENTS TO SEE IF 

I THE "Oakwood Experience" is one worht having. We've all 
I: been there before. Now that college days has returned we 

p HAVE' ALL' GOTTEN THE OPPORTLJN^^^TQ^^^^^^^^W UPCOMING 



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CLASS THE GREATNESS THAT IS - 

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teliiiilill^' DRUM LINE, UNDER THE DIRECTION' OE KeVIN JaCKSON 
MMY GeRVAIS, put ON A REMARKABLE SHOW DURING THE 
I HALFTIME SHOW AND CONTINUOUSLY HYPED THE CROWD FROM THE 
I SIDE LINES. ItW^AS AN INCREDIBELW^AY TO SHOW THE COLLEGE DAYS 
I STUDENTS R SCHOOL SPIRIT. ThE gil REPORTERS PUT ON AN 

I IMPROMPTU PERFORMANCE FOR THE STUDENTS IN FRONT OF FORD 

I Hall.We know howto show these young kids what we're 

I WORKING with. ChAPEL THE NEXT MORNING WAS OF COURSE 
I E\'ENTFUL, HIGH SHCOOL STUDENTS PRESENTED WITH ALL THE \^\ST 
I OPPORTUNITES AHEAD OF THEM, NOT ONLY HERE ^T ^^p, BUT 
I ANYM^HERE THEY CHOOSE TO PERSUE A HIGHER EDUCATION. AlL IN 
li ALL ANOTHER SUCCESSFUL GOLLEGE DaYS.. 



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OcrOliKR '2()l(4, \)r. LkSMK N. PoI.I.AHD was OMK I AI.I.V I\S1 All 1 IJ \S nil 1 1 1 AlAllI 
PrKSIDKNT of OaKWOOD I iMVl.HSnA'. 

Dr. Pollard brl\(;.s (;RLAr sririilal, acadlmk , wn liadli^siiip skii i s io i in. 

TAULL AS IlL IS rilKONLV PrLSIDLNT K) HAVL SLR\'l .1) AS SLMOU l'\SIOH Ol I I II 1111 A 

Oakvvood C'()LLK(;LCin;R('n, and has acqlirld a roi al oi- ,-^ ni (,hi is: a hv hi i oks, 

TWO MASTLRS, AND rWO PilD.S. I II ALSO RL(;LLARLV LLD OI I I\ I.I ADI KMIlI' 
(X)NFERENCLS ALL AROLND IIIL WORLD. 

The promlse, hope, and mrLRL of Oakwood rlsis ln sli,\ii\(,i.^ c \i'\p>i i ii wn^. 

AND THE ACTION PrESIDENI' PoLLARD HAS ALREADY r.\KLN K) IMl'KOX 1 I III ( WIIM ^ II \^ 
BEEN (;REA'1'LY APPRECIATED HY THE STUDENTS, FR(3M 1 HE RL(,ISI H.\I ION I'KO( I SS l',l I\(, 
MUCH EASIER FHAN THE PAST TO HIM WORKING WITH I iSM CLCJSLLV .\ND (()(;I'I K \ I I\ 1 1 \ . 

"You can't love Garwood wtfhout loving ris siudents," decl.vhi d Pollakd. I Ii^ 

DEEP LOVE FOR LIIE SCHOOL AND ITS STUDENTS IS BEINC; REFLlXrLl) IN HIS WORK lOK I III 

IInivf:rsity. 





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HB56 

"An Act [intended]... to prohibit an alien unlawfully present in the United States from 
receiving any state or local public benefits; ...to require business entities or employers 
seeking economic incentives to verify the employment eligibility of their employees and to 
provide penalties;... to require the verification of the legal status of persons by law 
enforcement under certain circumstances...." Such is how Alabama's controversial new 
immigration law posits itself from jump. HB 56, despite its bland moniker, has been 
proceeded by a political firestorm: some, like our own Dr. Giro Sepulveda — chair of the 
History department and a featured speaker at the anti-HB 56 rally held by NAPS a few 
weeks ago, in the wake of the law's enactment — deem it blatantly "racist," "right-wing 
Republican" and "[the work of the] Tea Party," and have, literally, marched against it, as a 
group of our own did in Montgomery on October 9. Others are rather satisfied with the 
law's provisions; after all, economic times are tough and illegal "moochers" shouldn't be 
allowed to stay and benefit from our jobs, our school system and our generally tax- 
supported way of life. The two sides go IN... hard. 

In favor of the law, a chorus of mostly Republican voices sound off about the federal 
government's ineptitude — some say complacency — in enforcing immigration laws. They 
point to alarming statistics assembled by, for example, the Federation for American 
Immigration Reform — statistics like, paying for the education of the children of illegal 
immigrants is the single largest public expenditure, at $52 billion, which is mostly paid for 
by local and state governments; statistics like, while the federal government pays $30 
billion for illegal immigration, local and state governments bear the brunt of the cost, 
spending something like $84 billion annually; and like, while illegal immigrants contribute 
$13 billion in taxes, they cost American tax payers approximately $100 billion more than 
that. Statistics are funny things — how they change depending on who's counting. 



92 



Nevertheless, these statistics in conjunction with arguments about the scarcity of v/ork— 
especially in this just-coming-up-from-a-recession, unemployment-laden economy— being 
exacerbated by illegal immigrants who are hired for cheap in. particularly, service industry 
jobs have made for an emboldened group who fully sanction the "harshest" anti-illegal 
immigration law to have ever been passed, as the National Immigration Law Center 
describes it. 

On the other hand, some Americans, including Attorney General Eric Holder, are 
passionately opposed to what they view as the law's racist, scapegoating, family-splitting 
tendency, and argue that it constitutionally cannot stand, as it allows Alabama to step into 
federal immigration policy territory. This side notes that racial profiling is built into the law. as 
U.S. District Judge Blackburn (in her, believe it or not, taming revision of the law before it 
went into effect on September 28) let stand the provision that law enforcement be given 
authority to check the immigration status of those whom they have "reasonable suspicion" 
are illegal immigrants. Although recently blocked by the 11th Circuit Court while the U.S. 
Department of Justice appeals Judge Blackburn's earlier ruling in District Court, section 28 
of the law requires public school students to prove their immigration status or be presumed 
undocumented. Furthermore, some note (the other side would argue, based on false 
intuition and not fact) that the jobs that many immigrants do are so-called ■gutter jobs" and 
unwanted by Americans, and, if illegal immigrants are barred from employment, a huge, 
slow-to-fill gap in the jobs sector will ensue. 

Aside from perspectives, what have been the real effects so far? Illegal immigrant parents 
are preparing notarized letters concerning the care of their children should they be deported. 
The same for their assets. Some are so frightened that they have decided to take their 
children out of school, as journalists and school officials report. A few of us Oakwood 
students have personally noticed the effects, as at least some conspicuous portion of the 
staff at our off-campus restaurant jobs have up and gone. 

Do you know someone who is illegally in Alabama, in Huntsville...here at Oakwood'r' Think 
about what you would want for that person— for their education, their professional success. 
their safety and stability. Think for a while, then read the text of HB 56. , ,and then say 
something forceful and informed, one way or another. This is l aw is too critical to keep s ilent 
about. 



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The Byrds Are Back! 



Much like army brats, pastor's br— kids are accustomed to moving on a fairly regular 
basis. So as the children of pastors, all four members of the Byrd family were prepared (if 
a bit somber at heart) to move from Georgia to Alabama. Anyone who was present at 
Oakwood University Church on January 14, 2012 or knows someone who was present can 
tell you that we are in for a mighty move of God on Oakwood's campus and in Huntsville 
as Dr. Byrd takes on the task of shepherding the Oakwood flock (both church and schools) 
and evangelizing all of Huntsville. If the atmosphere felt at the Installation service is any 
indication of things to come, Oakwood University Church will never be the same again! But 
after chatting over dinner at the market with Mrs. Danielle Byrd and the two Byrd girls, I 
think I can tell you a little bit about what they're feeling as a family, how the move has been 
for them, and what they hope to accomplish during their time in Huntsville. 

Dr. & Mrs. Byrd are no strangers to Oakwood or to Huntsville (HSV). Mrs. Byrd lived 
here from the ages of 5-10 years old when her father served as the assistant Pastor of 
Oakwood Church. She came back and attended Oakwood (then College) University where 
she met Dr. Byrd, who was born in Baton Rouge, Louisiana but whose grandmother lived 
in HSV. So when I asked what, if anything, made this move different than others, she 
explained that they don't have to do much "getting used to" Huntsville. Usually have to get 
acclimated to a city: learn its streets, make new friends, etc. However, Mrs. Byrd told me 
that as she stood on the pulpit on Saturday with her family, she looked out and saw peers 
she'd grown up with, elders she'd been brought up by, & students she'd taught at Greater 
Atlanta Adventist Academy (GAAA) who now attend OU. I imagine that brought both joy 
and comfort to her heart. This made for a smooth transition from GA to HSV. 

Mrs. Byrd admitted that no move is ever easy. The hardest part for her was leaving 
GAAA and her students. She went on to say, "But when you see God's hand in it, that 
trumps everything." I was thinking that finding a new home would have proven difficult but 
she clarified that "God orchestrated the whole thing!" They love the house and Mrs. Byrd 
describes it as her retreat. The girls, 10 year old Christyn and 8 year old Caileigh, told me 
the hardest part for them was the physical act of moving! Watching the movers pack up 
their belongings and then unpacking the boxes themselves was a bit trying but they are 
resilient and bounced back from that particular trial. Their parents were very concerned 
about uprooting the girls in the middle of a school year but Mrs. Byrd describes them as 
troopers, as they are taking it all in stride and enjoying it, at that. 

Adventist education is amazing in that one can move from one school to the next and 
find little variation in curriculum, so that the girls were able to pick up at Oakwood 
Elementary almost exactly where they'd left off at Berean Christian Junior Academy. The 
girls love their new school and the new people they're meeting; Christyn really likes her 5th 
grade teacher and Caileigh is rapidly making new friends. As seen by their quirky faces 
and many questions for their parents on Saturday while on the pulpit, they're your average 
young girls, except in one respect. They share their mother's brilliance and their father's 
flair for the dramatic & expressiveness. I've met many children in my lifetime but few have 
rivaled the eloquence, hilarity, sincerity, and intelligence I've seen displayed in Christyn 
and Caileigh. Christyn, at 10, is trying to decide between being a pharmaceutical scientist 
who will cure cancer, or a pastor. Caileigh wants to be a news reporter & after I suggested 
it (oops!), is also considering acting. 



94 



Mrs. Byrd also has plans for the future. For one, she recently travelled to Loma Linda 
University (LLU) during the Minority Introductions to The Health Sciences (MITHS) program 
where she discovered that she'd like to further her education in Public Health (like yours truly!). 
And if everything goes as planned, she'll be starting LLU's online Master's program. But even 
closer to home, she's begun talking to Mr. Cheddar and the audio visual crew at Oakwood 
Church about her dream of setting up internship-like opportunities through the Breath of Life 
Ministry for OU students! She wants to bridge the gap between the students and the church 
and since she's already well acquainted with many students here, I'd say she's going to be a 
great liaison for us. Even though I say she's not nearly old enough, Mrs. Byrd wants to kind of 
be a "mom on campus." She plans on being very visible and accessible on campus, putting up 
filers in the dormitories and keeping the lines of communication open between the students and 
the church. Both she and Dr. Byrd were really involved with USM while they were at Oakwood 
College (he even served as USM President before graduating) so she's willing and more than 
able to serve Oakwood students again. 

Mrs. Byrd, like her husband, wants to gain an awareness of the needs of the 
community and the church, and then embark on meeting those needs. Dr. and Mrs. Byrd are 
truly a powerful couple and we're blessed to have them. The Lord, in His omnipotence, brought 
them together right here on these sacred grounds, in Oakwood University Church. They did as 
they'd been taught and departed to serve and now they're back, with their own children, to lead. 
instruct, and serve God's children. As dubbed by Linda Martin (representative from the Mayors 
office), they truly are the Boomerang Byrds, returning to their original launching point with the 
wind of God under their wings. We pray the Lord will continue to make the path straight before 
them and bless their ministry at Oakwood University Church. I'll be there on Wednesday 
evenings for a mid-week refreshing, and bright and early Sabbath mornings to hear the Word 
(and to ensure a seat, too). Hope to see you there Oakwoodites! 





..^-• 




:>- 




ARRI\ E AT THE FliTURISTIC ALL GLASS CONCERT HALL WHERE THE AeOLIANS ARE SCHEDULED TO PERFORN 
IN LESS THAN A MINUTE. NoW THE QUESTION IS, HOW WILL I GET IN WITHOUT A TICKET? I SEE A WHOLE 
GROUP OF PEOPLE W^ALKING WITH PURPOSE SO I FOLLOW THEM INTO THE HALL AND UP A FEW ESCALATORS. I 
SEE THESE SAME PEOPLE APPROACH A DOORWAY AND SHOW THE MEN GUARDING THE DOOR THEIR TICKETS. I 
ATTEMPT TO CREEP BY AS IF Fm INVISIBLE. "NiET," ONE OF THE GUARDS SAYS TO ME. I SMILE, AND TRY TO 
REASON WITH HIM IN BROKEN ENGLISH (aS IF THAT EVER WORKS). He GIVES ME A LOOK, AND DIRECTS ME 
OVER TO ANOTHER GUARD WHO UNDERSTANDS A LITTLE ENGLISH. "I - AM- WITH -THE- CHOIR." He 
SMILES AT ME AND TELLS ME THAT I SHOULD ENTER THROUGH THE STAFF ENTRANCE. "ThANK YOU, SPACIBA,' 
I TELL HIM. He T\KES ME OUTSIDE AND LEANS OVER THE BALCONY TO POINT ME IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION. 
"SpACIBA," I TEL^^ilM AGAIN. 

After \ few I®I)re minutes of being semi-lost, I finally find the floor wTiERE I need to be. I 
ARRIVE bac ks I \(;f ri(;ht in time to hear the choir begin the concert with the familiar song, "Lift 
Every Voici \\d sing." I hear someone ask manager, Vilroy Mcbean, what song it is. He replies 

that it's IIIL AtKoAMERICAN NATIONAL AnTHEM. ThEY NOD THEIR HEADS IN UNDERSTANDING. 




100 



"None of the students could have imagined the kind of 

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TlIK CIIOIH SOI.'NDS lilvMl IICI,. TlIK ACOCSl K S AHl. ( HISl' WD I 111 I IMI I I\(- I^ \ OKI WP. I'-l J 1 
RKFLlX-riNC; OFlOl' MASSIVi; ()R(;A\ I'll'lS. Till, IIAI.I, is I III., I ROM I 111 (-Km \1J ll(;ni' lO llll l',\l.(OMI.S 

wrrii 1':a(;kr Russian facks. 'IYikv look to hi, i,\ awf, as ir iiii,') ( \\\oi lii i ii \ i i iii ii \i<M')\n,s 
coMiNc; FROM 'FiiF s'i'A{;f. Nfjthkr can I. 

OnF OFTIIE MOST POWFRFIII, MOMKN'FS OFIIIF (ONC IRT W as W III \ l\ \ SI'ORMjK \I0\II.M DlKi.f IOR 

Jason Ffrdinand iiirnfi) fo fiif aiidifncf and invi'i id i iii,\i io ini\ iiii ( iiuih i\ \ m hm. oi 

"AmA/IN(; (iRACF." Af Fills I'OIX'F I AM SFF'FINf; IN FIIF Al :|)II,\( I., AIONf, Willi PRI SIDI \ I Poi I \HD. Ill^ 
WIFF, AND A FEW OTHER OaKWOOD ALUM, AND THE SOUND OV RuSSIAX VOK Is sl\(,l\(, \( \ri 1 l,\ l^ 
RIN(;iN(; SOFFLY THROUGH OUR EARS. I LOOK UP AT SOME OF THE FACES IN llll (IK )1H ( )\ 1 l<\\ 111 I All D \M I 1 1 

EMOTION. This moment could not have been planned. Tfie uord bi.,\i hi i i, im^i s soi hicin kj 

CAPTURE IT. 

JUS'F AS I FIIINK it's SAFE TO RELAX MY EYE MUSCLES, CHOIR .VIEMBFr/ I'.VSIOK, Rl( II \I<D M \KI IX 1 III.-, 
THE AUDIENCE TO HOLD HANDS AND CLOSE THEIR EYES. He THEN PROCEEDS K ) I'AIX 1 A Dl 1 \I1 I 1) I'K I I Hi 
OF A PLACE WITH NO DEATH, ONLY LOVE, AND SINGING. TfIE WOMAN NEXT 'I(J Ml is Sll 1 XI \s 1 IK )1 D III.H 
HAND, BUT AS SHE BEGINS TO HEAR THE WORDS BEING TRy\NSLATED INTO RuSSI.VX, Sill s( )Bs (Jl 11 1 l\ . 

None of the students could have imagined the kind of imprint iiiiy \\i ri c ai'ahi i oi li w ix(, 

ON A COUNTRY ALREADY SO MARKED WFFII IIFS'FORY. I DON't THINK ANYONE WAS KRl l'\Kl D 1 ( )K 1 111 MX|) 
OF EMOTION IN THE CATHEDRAL THAT NIGHT. I KEPT HAVING TO USE DIFFERENT TRICKS, 1 IKl 1 II riX(, \n 
HEAD BACK, OR CLOSING MY EYES LONG ENOUGH FOR THE TEARS TO DISSOLVE. GoD REAFIY slK )W 1 1) 111^ 
FACE AT THE CONCERT THAT NIGHT, AND TO HAVE BEEN ABLE TO SHARE SUCH EMOTION AXD MIMC Willi \ 
WHOLE OTHER PEOPLE MADE IT TFIAT MUCH MORE POWERFUL. LoVE WAS THE III IMA 11 ( ( i\l\ll XK \ i K >\. 
AND IF NOTHINC; ELSE, THAT IS WHAT THE PEOPLE OF MoSCOW LEFT THE CONCERT II Al 1 Willi. 



XOVE WAS THE 

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"A Cinderella Story" was Oakwood's 2012 Spring Banquet's theme. 
And more than dictating what we wore, the theme showed us what we 

SHOULD BE ABOUT EMBODYING AS A SCHOOL. ErICA OgBOENYIYA WANTED TO D( 
SOMETHING SPECIAL AND OUT OF THE ORDINARY WITH THIS YEAR's BANQUET 
(theme). So SHE, ALONG WITH USM, NAPS, THE ReD RoBIN RESTAURANT, THE 

Embassy Suites, and a few dollars from each ticket purchased, set out 

TO CREATE A REAL-LIFE CiNDERELLA STORY FOR SOME UNDER-PRIVILEGED 
DAUGHTERS OF THE King. mmm 



Through the weekly outreach ministry that NAPS does in 

HuNTSVILLE's housing projects, 7 GIRLS WERE CHOSEN BY THEIR COMMUNITY 
AND THE NAPS MEMBERS WHO WORK WITH THEM EACH WEEK. FOR ONE 
WEEKEND, THOSE 7 GIRLS RECEIVED THE ROYAL TREATMENT. ThEY WERE TAKEN 
TO THE STORE, WHERE THEIR FITTING ROOMS WERE PERSONALIZED, TRIED ON AND 
THEN HAD DRESSES BOUGHT FOR THEM. ThEY ENJOYED DISCOUNT MEALS FROM 

Red Robin and a free night stay at the Embassy Suites. Their hair, nails 

AND "makeup" was DONE BY QaKWOOD STUDENTS, THEY HAD A PHOTO SHOOT, 
GOT ALL PRETTIED UP (TRANSFORMED, IF YOU WILl), AND WERE WHISKED TO THE 

banquet in their horse drawn carriage. 

When we watched these girls viewing their own transformation by 
video at the banquet, i think we were all reminded why we learn to 

SERVE AT OaKWOOD UNIVERSITY. ThE AWE, AMAZEMENT, LOVE, AND 
GRATEFULNESS BURSTING FORTH FROM THEIR LITTLE EYES SAID EVERYTHING. ThF 
MAY NOT LIVE HAPPILY EVER AFTER, BUT THAT'S A NIGHT I DOUBT THEY'lL EVER 
FORGET. For all INVOLVED, IT WAS INDEED, A NIGHT TO REMEMBER. 



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I really 
planning Agape ^ 
Dee rmy fellow ^' ' 
[j:o go out and h, 
hard work and toUcf^ed 



appreciate USM f 



Day! It ^IMvery nice to 
classmate '5 willing spirits 
the community. We di<Ti^Q»T« 



hard work and toucT^ed 'hearts in the proce. ^ 

'people that we helped were so thankful and they wat»i^ 
to come back more often. This was a good event, but I 
Iwould like4o-iee this sort of self-denyJQ^ Christ- like 



-'-like. Agape, love. So as an' 



'i opportunity. So as an Oakwood student I 

say that this was a great o ppo rt u ^^^^ ^|Jjm ^i 
^s a Christian I say the j 

^^ experience of Agape Day can 
have a real stance and 
application in our 



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An Bxietevitlal Revolution 

-~—^——^:., acting, feeling, living individiM ' 



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HE OaKWOODITE 

Revolution of Style 



& 
A Lesson in Individuality 







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NDniDUALITY IS SOMETIMES AN ELUSIVE THING, BECOMING SOMETHING AKIN TO MYTHICAL DURING 
one's COLLEGE YEARS. Bv ITS SIMPLE DEFINITION, YOU'd THINK INDI\'IDUALITY WAS SOMETHING EASY TO 
ACHIEVE: it's the MERE, UNFETTERED ACT OF ONE's EXISTENCE.. .HOW HARD CAN IT BE? Ho\\'EVER, It's A 
STRUGGLE: YOU STRUGGLE AGAINST THE INFLUENCE OF YOUR PEERS (iS THIS WHO I WANT TO BE OR WHO 
THEY WANT ME TO BE?), YOU STRUGGLE TO CONSIDER THE INFLUENCE OF ChRIST, YOU STRUGGLE TO 
RESPECT YOUR PARENTS AND THEIR VALUES (w^HEN DO THEY BECOME YOUR \'ALUES?), AND YOU STRUGGLE 
WITH SOCIAL PROPRIETY ...ALL WHILE STRUGGLING TO BE YOURSELF. To BE UNIQUE. HoW EXACTLY 
DOES ONE ACHIEVE TRUE INDIVIDUALITY WHEN THEY HAVE THESE VARIOUS ENTITIES AND INSTITUTIONS 
TO PAY EXISTENTIAL HOMAGE TO? We ANSWER THIS QUESTION VIA OUR OWN, SEPARATE REVOLUTIONS... 

but how does one distinguish between revolt for the sake of growth antd revolt just for 
the sake of revolt? 

That being said, it's no surprise that people sometimes forget indimdiialh y is not so 

MUCH ABOUT THE EXTERNAL AS THE INTERNAL, TH/VT IT's NOT A GIMMICK. YoU CAN't BUY IT AT A '^^ 
THRIFT STORE, YOU CAN't ACHIEVE IT BY MIMICKING THE SWAGGED OUT DUDE IN YOUR HEALTH CLASS, 
there's no TRICK OF LIGHT OR SLEIGHT OF HAND THAT CAN CREATE THE ILLUSION OF IT, AND YOU 
CERTAINLY DOn't DEVELOP IT BY CRITIQUING (PLAINLY, HATING ON.) THE NEXT CHICK. BUT, LET's BE 
real: it's Ey\SIER TO DO THOSE THINGS THAN TO PERFECT THE AST 0¥ BEVOUJTION , ISN't IT? It's EASIER 
TO DO THOSE THINGS THAN TO ASCERTAIN WHETHER OR NOT WHAT YOU LO\T, AND THEREFORE WHO 
YOU REALLY ARE, IS WORTH STAGING A REVOLUTION. 



120 



'riii, TKcni IS, n's NO'i vii.Avrio i',i. iiiai iiahd. 

'1 HK KIA' IS IN I,IVIN(; SIMIM.V. Vol K,\(A\, lO IIVI. AM) I.I T I.IVI'.. 

SiMI'I.V IMn, VVi: ADAI'ir.I) nil. IKADll IONS Ol I'HIAIOI S M.M.KAI lO.XS I\10 AIM. W 1. I-1_\K.\LD 

TO LKT riiK riiiN(;s vvi: i.ovi. di.m.m. rs u.xi iii.h i iia\ i iikim. o\ uh.vi \\i. ii.\i i.. In 

CONFKONI'INC; 11 IK I :C;i.INi:SS IN OCR SI.IAI.S, \\l. IKAINl I) OIK l.VI.S I O Sl.l. 11 IK liK.M'KV AKOINI) 
IIS. \Vk DKVKKOI'KI) TIIK I'KNCIIAN I TO KK( 0(,NI/,1, Ol 1< OW A I'O I I.N 1 I AK, HA I III 1' I H \.\ .SE'H KINf, 
KOH OUR I'OTKN'riAK'rO BK RKVKAKKI) TO US. iVlK( II IN 1 111 WAV («01) INIKNUI 1), \M \'A.(.\S I O 
HKOSSOM FROM TIIK INSIDK our, RAIIIKR THAN FOOKISI IKV 1 Jl AKK( Jl'INt, AN l\IA(,l. 1 ROM 1111 
OIITSIDK IN. Wk HKVOUrriONIZia) TIIK IDKA Ol I l)l\ 11)1 Mil ^ AM) \I.\I)K II IN lO AN ARI lORM. 
SoMKIIOW INDIVIDIiAKllA BKCAMK A SI HM'OR'rn'K .VIO\'K.Vll.Nl , RAllll.R 11I\N A ONI.-\IAN SHOW... 
'SIMI'IA I)<)IN(; TIIK OlM'OSnK OF WHAT KVKRVONK KI.SK IS I)()1N(,'... A VU;S.\I( . A I'ORIK.MI. An 
K\llIHHION...CAKK IF VVIIA'FKVKR \(.)[' VVIKK. TlFVl's INDIMDl Al.ll 1 OR \< )\ . 



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INDIVIDUALITY IS NOT SO 
MUCH ABOUT THE 
E^XTERNAL AS THE 




•|W£ REVOLUTIONIZED 

THE IDEA OF 

LNDIVIDUAUTY AND 

MADE IT INTO AN ART 



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HE INSTANT FAMILIARITY BETWEEN THE FIVE IS COMICAL TO SAY THE LEAST. ThEY ARE 
EASY IN THEIR BANTER, MOST COMFORTABLE IN FRONT OF THE CAMERA WHEN THEY HAVE NO 
KNOWLEDGE OF THE QUICK WINK, THEN SNAP OF ITS SHUTTER. AfTER A FEW ROUNDS OF THIS, SOME 
WIND-CHILLED DEGREES LATER, AND A FEW FAILED ATTEMPTS AT CAT-WALKING, WE'vE DETERMINED THAT 
WE HAVE THE SHOT: ThE SHOT THAT EPITOMIZES NOT JUST THIS PARTICULAR GROUP OF YOUNG MEN, 
BUT OF THEIR PREDECESSORS, COLLEAGUES, AND THOSE WHO MAY FOLLO\^' IN THEIR FOOT STEPS. At 
LEAST, that's THE IDEA. NATURALLY, YOU DOn't BRING UP SUCH WEIGHT^' SUBJECTS TO ONE WHO IS 
UNDER THE FASHIONABLE SCRUTINY OF A CAMERA LENS. No, RATHER, YOU SAVE THE HEA\T STUFF FOR 
THE INTERVIEW. 

No ONE CAN PREDICT THE FUTURE. So, IT GOES WITHOUT SAYING THAT It'd DO ME NO GOOD TO SIT 
DOWN A TABLE OF YOUNG, BLACK MEN AND DEMAND THAT THEY SOMEHOW CHANNEL THEIR (OURI') 
ANCESTORS AND DI\'INE THE FUTURE OF BLACK AMERICA FOR US. AnD WHO ARE WE KIDDINGl' W'e'rE 
COLLEGE STUDENTS, NOT POLITICAL ANALYSTS. INSTEAD, WE MADE A COLLECTIVE EFFORT TO DIVINE THE 
EVENTS OF THE PAST AND PRESENT. SCRATCH THAT: THE ONLY THING WE WERE TRYING TO DIVINE IS 
WHAT EXACTLY THE PURPOSE OF THIS INTERVIEW WAS. I MEAN, REALLY. HeRE I WAS, WITH A PAGE FULL 
OF QUESTIONS THAT HAD NO SPECIFIC DIRECTION, SO I WAS RELYING QUITE HEAVILY ON THE BOYS TO 
GIVE ME A FOCUS. ThERE HAD TO BE SOMETHING THAT WOULD TIE TOGETHER THIS DISCUSSION, SOME 
THEME THAT GAVE A HEARTY SALUTE TO BLy\CK HISTORY MONTH. SOMETHING BEYOND YOUTH AND 
SUCCESS AND THE ANTIQUATED MARATHON METAPHORS. ..YES: IDENTITY'. HeRE WE ARE, LIVING IN 
ALLEGEDLY POST-RACIAL AMERICA AND ONE MUST COME TO THE REALIZATION THAT IT's NOT EXACTLY 
ABOUT COLOR ANYMORE: IT's ABOUT HOW ONE CHOOSES TO IDENTIF\- THEMSEL\TS BEYOND THAT. ThE 
EMERGENCE OF SUCH A THEME ONLY MAKES SENSE THOUGH, BEING THAT EACH YOUNG MAN AT THE 
TABLE IS OF A DIFFERENT DISCIPLINE - A DISCIPLINE THAT IS SOMEHOW A REFLECTION OF \\'HO HE IS, 
REGy\RDLESS OF THE COLOR OF HIS SKJN. 



126 



'rAKKJOSJIl'A O'IVm.II S I'OK KXAMI'I,!.. 

( )'1Uli.ks.I()KIN(;i,v hi:m:)<,s to iiim.si;i,I' as a 'suim.h minokii v', I'.i.iNf, i iia i iii. ( omi.s i kom j'.oi ii a 
Mi'.xicAN AND Ai'Kican-AmI'Kican iiA(:K(;i<(M INI). "I'm a ( JiKisi IAN iiKsi. \'i.A, I'm Mi.xk:an 
Hi'.CAiisi'; riiA r'.s wiia i i'i:()IM,1'. i ij.i, mm I am, and I'm (jk \\ ii ii i iia i ... lii i in mv mind I'm ii si a 
CiiKisiiAN AND HUMAN." HivsiDiis lUiiNC siMi*i,v HUMAN, O'Uai.i.ks IS A hikoi.ooian and an 

ASriKlN(; CAUIOONISr: his aim is IO MAKI: IIIN, KI.M.VANI ( JIHIVHAN KNrKHIAI.NMI.N'l . 'IhI, SIMI'I.I. 

■\'m: oI' 'MivMCan' d()i:s not ki:ai,ia do him (oh his hihii a(,k) (i;si k i.. I'A'khvonk akoi nd i m, 

TABLK SKKMS TO Blv OK IHI'. SAMK MIND: V\l IAri:Vi;K I.AIUII. VVi:'vi': lil.I.N AS( KIHI.D liV SO( III •» IS NOI 
NIX'KSSAUIIA WHO VVK AKl,. HaI IIKK IIIAN A (;i<Oi:i' Ol' ">()liN(, UI,A( K MKN, I Sl.l. AN AKKAV Ol 

kxi'i:hiknc:i:s and i'krsonali tiks bivFokk mk. Am. kiim: kok thk imckinc;, so to spkak. Di.sim i i 
riiKSK insta-stamps of 'iii,Ac;K' AND 'wiini:' AND 'iiisi'anic', tiikkk is s'hi.i. (so,mi:ik)u) ko(j\i I ok 
ONI, to he whokvkr tiik'*' dksikk k) iu:. I'd vkniukk to sav riiAi this soki oi i ( jrw akd 

rillNKINC IS rilK COKNKU.SrONK OK l'UO(;i<i;SSI( )N, rilAT SIKH A KKKSII Arini Dl, IS \MIAI \MI.I, DKIVK 

Black Amkhka f.vkr-kokvvaud 



Ok coursk, wnii iiik rrosimxt ok I'Ro(,ki.ssion (omi.s .\n 

UNDKR.SIANDAIiLK MKASURK OK KI:AR. Till II .\R Ol l-,\ll,rRl., 

sit.cificallv. Ik's a subtle thing, bl'i ii would sll.m ihai 
Blac:k America has sampled a iarc;er drau(;ht of i his 

I REI'IDAKION FIIAN IS NORMAL: Ol'IEN, We'rE I OLD KO I„\( LI., IO 
DO OUR Bi:.S'l' BECAUSE there IS SOME OMINOUS ENl 1 1 '> \\.\riIN(, 
KO IHI'K us KHROUCH KHE RIN(;ER - AND ALL BI.CAIISE ()V IIIL 
COLOR OF OUR SKIN. W'e'rE '1'AU(;H'K IO EXCEL ON BEHALF OK 

Black America. ..buk what about on behalf of ourseia is:' 
w'n ii such a large cliii' on our collective sikjuldlr, ii 's n(j 

WONDER KHE STAKES SEEM SO FII(;H AND THE FH\R RUNS S(; DLKJP. 




IIOWFA'ER, KHE YOUNG MEN AROUND THE TABLE ASSER'K KHAT 
ONE isn't DEFINED l>,\ I HEIR EMI.IRES - 'Kll.\ K WH.\ I W K 
CONSIDER FAILURES ARE THE MERE COST OF EXPERIENCE. TfIAT 
THERE IS, IN FACT, NO SUCH TFIING AS FAILURE. ESPECIALLY A'K 
THIS AGE. "The WAY I SEE IT, I'm TOO YOUNC; FOR FAILURE", 
COMES JOURDAN \\'.\YS ASSESSMENT OF THE MAITER. ThoU(;H 
BRAZEN, W'A'iS' ASSESSMENT IS FAIR. W'.VYS, LIKE MANY OF US, 
HAS (JRAPPLED WITH HIS CHOICE OF M.\10R. He CH.\NC;ED IK KROM 
BIOLOGY TO BUSINESS, AND HE SEEMS PERFF.CKI.Y ,\ K E.\SE, SELF 
ASSURED EVEN, IN THE FACE OF ACCOMPLISHING HIS GO. M.S. "Ye.V, 
YOU HAN'E'KO REGROl'P AND RE-ASSESS AND Tm PRFP.VRl.D KOR 

Kii.vK." Some migh i .\r(;il kh.v i i his is jus k \mi.\ k n mi vns vo 

BE 'young and dumb'. Yl..\, SURE. It SEEMS ,\ SIMPl K LNOl (;il 
PHILOSOPHY, BUK IK IS BELIED BY ,V RKKRFSHING ACX KPl \NC 1 Ol 
KHE COMPLEX. 








The way Stephen Manders puts it, "Having 

MULTIPLE dimensions TO ONE's WORLD-VIEW, TO 
one's SELF, CAN BE BOTH A BLESSING AND A CURSE. 

Being that complex can be frustrating." Again, 

IT IS a QUESTION OF IDENTITY' AND ALBEIT THE REASON 
MOST PEOPLE ABSTAIN FROM PUSHING BEYOND THE 
LABEL OF 'black': SOMETIMES It's TOO MUCH TO BE 
SOMETHING OR SOMEONE OTHER THAN EVERYONE ELSE 
AROUND YOU. OtHER THAN WHAT YOU WERE 'bORN', I 

SUPPOSE. Maybe that's why we've developed the 

UNFORTUNATE HABIT OF EQUATING QUALITY' AND 
SUCCESS WITH 'white'. We THROW AROUND WORDS 
AND PHRASES SUCH AS 'bOUGIE' AND 'UPPIT\'' IN ORDER 
TO DOWNPLAY THE ACHIEVEMENTS AND TASTES OF 

OTHER African Americans; it is somehow implied, 

NOT BY WHITE PEOPLE, BUT BY OUR OWN KIND THAT 
EXCELLENCE MAKES YOU 'lESS BLACK'. 

We're coached on how to regard other races, we str.\tegize as to how to fend off 'The 
Man's' attacks, but there is one piece of the battle plan that we're missing: we were never 

TAUGHT TO DEFEND OURSELVES AGAINST EACH OTHER. AgAINST HUMAN NATURE. SiMPLY PUT, THE BATTLE 
OUR PROVERBIAL ANCESTORS FOUGHT HAS QUIETED A FEW DECIBELS: THE RACE WAR IS NOW A SILENT WAR 
THAT WE FIGHT AMONGST OURSELVES. It MANIFESTS ITSELF IN OUR RIDICULOUS COMPULSION TO MEASURE 

'blackness'. When we're not too busy analyzing melanin samples, we're cutting down the 

AMBITIOUS AND OPEN-MINDED BY SHUNNING THEM: WE FLAT OUT REFUSE TO CELEBRATE EACH OTHER's 

success. Instead, we'd rather give the notorious 'side-eye' and talk out the side of our mouths 

ABOUT HOW, "he THINKS HE's BETTER THAN US." We SPENT CENTURIES EVADING THE NOOSE AND LYNCHIN( 
MOBS, ONLY TO TURN AROUND AND PLANT KNIVES IN EACH OTHER's BACKS. ViNCENT SpELLMAN GIVES AN : 
APT DESCRIPTION OF THIS PHENOMENON: "CrABS IN A B S.UREL S\NDRO\IL." HoW FIIT I.\G. WlIY ARL \\'E SO 



Ql IC K lO DIMSJ Ol RSLIM S OF DISTINCTION;' I'J" SHOULD BL CArCllINC;! 

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IIINK ir WAS ME 



IVm not competing against anyone 

I M NOT COMFKl'INC Af.AINS'l ,\,\VOM-. 
Birr MYSELF., I USED TO T 

Si: 1,1'. 1 [ 

A(;AINST THE WORLD BU 1' NOW I HEALIZi: 

: I riii': vvoKi,!) i'.i ; r no . 

ITS JUST ME AGAINS r ME. 

ITS j1 1 ST MK A(;A1N,'iI Ml 




"We're battling iii m \n nai l rl 

AND that TAKES C'llRls 
AM) rilAi' 1 

JOSIII A () B \l I I s 



SpKLI.MAN BKIN(;S UP ANMNlT.UF.S'nN(; I'OIM . "I nilNK 11 "s M\ 1015 roiiMNiin xnslll \s \ lU \i K 
MAN, KSI'KCIAMA W IIKN I IK) W 1 ,1 .1 ... 11 URl 's \1 KIAO'* IXOICII M CA 1 1\ 1 I'OK 1 K \^ \1 s < H lU \i k Ml \. 1 l" 
MY DUIT IX) snow orilKUWlSK." Is I'llAr OrUjOlU' ( )r 11 \\ 1 \\ 1 1I\\IM (,oII1\ IO Mil I'OIN I WlllKl 
WE SHOIILD BE CC)N11'()K1A1UA Al I'lAirriNC; l() ASSlNlllAll .' \\'lll Kl. ()rK C)\n lOH Mlol 11) HI |o IM Rsl 1 
OUR SINCULAR INTERIMS IS TO THE BEST OF OUR ABIl 1 I A .' M U 1 1 \1 1 J 1 \l IM K I \i Kl 1 s 1 Ills 1 ROM \\i M 111 R 
AN(;EE. "I MEAN, I I'lllNK ANYONE IS CAl'ABl 1 OF ANA rill\(:...r\llHM \\. K 1 I Rl \1 n IM'U IIH lUM \ 
BEAC'K MAN SI IOUEDN'f SCORE AS 1 11( ;l I AS AN Asi \N \l \N OR W 1 111 1 M \\ .' ( )u\ lol sM . W 1 i \\ IHM.Rl \1' 
■FlllNCS." 'I'UE BAl TEE Fills ClATRAllON MClllS IS NO I ONI lll\l i \\ \\\ W ON W I I 1 I HOM O I 1 s \Nn 
FREEDOM MARC'Ul'.S: IF IS ONE rilAF RECJEIRl S MNl ssl \N 1 1 SKII I . I I "s Ni ) 1 1 1 1 1 R \l lU OOP. s\\ 1 \l. XNO 
'FEARS 'FllA'F WIFE ENSURE FllE FE 11 Rl ()!■ Bl \t K A\ll RU \, lU I KNOW 1 1 1 U . 1 . 1 Rl OlIloN. \Nli 
RES1E1ENC'E...ASS1M1EAF10N E\ EN. ASSIMIFAIION lUs NU, \ 1 1\ I C ( )N NO 1 W ION s. lU 1 I'm Ol 1111 OPINION 
FlFVl' ASSIMIEAFION WOUll) BE IRl 1 INC. 






WtililBRH 



Art, Speech, Inovation, Self Awareness. 




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It s funny, '^^^"^^ —_--,- 

The only thing stopping me form being whole in a hole, 

But HOW AM I SUPPOSED TO FILL A SOUL OR A VOID SHAPED LIKE Gods. 

Cause I've tried %^ J 

Numerous times I'd, 

Inebriate TO ALLEVIATE THE PAIN. 

Done gained momentary curtains to cast hope over my burdens.'*"""" "*"" '" "^ " " 

Done seen bottles bottoms bare 

And had drunken moments shared with niggas as lost as I am. 

Done mulatto mixed Hens with light liquors 

And had light flicker on places and faces a child of God should never grace 

And yet still I hasten to tip bottles 

More than I've opened Bibles, 

Cause YOU see God don't like my kind of fun 

And so I run to places where ladies thighs be bare 

Skirts high 

And guys stare 

And pop wine so we can whine on them as if clothes and there 

Cause see right here 

I CAN FIND THE KIND OF LOVE IN THE CLUB THAT THEY DOn't OFFER AT THE ALTER 

And while the saved might fault us, 

Few pray while most just watch us 

Our WATCHES are w^atched to make sure we clock into spots while the doors are still free 

Freed, is what my ancestors chose to be 

But see me I done stepped gracefully back into history „,, ; 

Done placed it in my grasp , ^^ ' 

And Like my foremothers I clasp, and throw seeds I 

That grown trinity green leaves ■'■'* 

Celebrating 4/20 like 1863 ain't never happen. '\ 

Yea WE MIGHT BE free. 

But see me, I'm enslaved to an outlawed master 

I embrace MY BROW^N BASTARD 

Haze, KUSH, AND FRUITY FLOWERS ..,;:"^' t :.>-i^^^^» 

Twisted up in tobacco sours my granddaddy was whipped on'backsI 

AnD while I BLACKEN MY LIPS TO ENCHANT PHILOSOPHY \ 

Note ^ ,, /.-.,,,,, ;m^,: ■ -■-^^.. •,- ^ ,, 

I ain't COPING WITH SMOKING ■ 

I'm MORE LIKE ENJOYING MY CULTURE X.., 

My YOUTH 

My college experience, my escape from God. '"' 

Cause see I'm tired of trying hide my flaws. 

Tired of trying to be someone who was pure and untainted. 

For so long I WAS painted Ellen White, 

But leaked sorrows can stream true colors And uncovered 

I'm just a rainbow^ of imperfection 

Done tight roped every sin but sex and 






asiais 



TlIAr's ONLY liKCAUSi; I'm SCARICI) OF PAIN, RUMORS, AND GKITING PREGNANT. 

So 'riioiicjH Till': 'i'iii(;iis be locked till tuk ring is plackd up on my fingkr 

I S riLL LIN(;ER BEIWEEN thoughts of purity ANU^E MAW'IAUJM'l-liNnOR 

In my mind ^ m / 

All the time 

I fantasi/k of my viikjinity's demise 

Bk( AI'SI, n 's like an EVKK CONSI ANI KEMINDEH rilAT I HAVE A GLOSKNKSS TO Gc)». 

And I don't wani' it, 
Hi:i ri' NEED II' 

And I TELL VOL lllIS IN SECHEi: 

I'm ini)li,(;in(; in ilesii av\a]<e 

And sckeamino aloi.d in sin 

Hecaise mv si'iHir veakns I'OU a coNNix "HON, liLi M\ ilesii won't le't^Pmn. 

V){ I I hear that ke(()(;nttion is the tikst stei' to (. 

So I liOAST' 

Whai mosi'tkv'to keei- camolflac;!';!) ,*" 
W'I'.'kt, teotlt: stakinc; at the s;Uj|E1j^s. ' 

HlT won't inter in 1()R COMMENri^^m". J 



To COMMON, I am a \()\'''i 



An 



'iNEs OF ('iikistianhv talk since 



Hi:t ev'-'^""'^' ' ^ 

(ioi) L*^^,.. 

And I^B(;oin(; i 
And I-UKe lost 
M^ memTJio' won' 
I'll he (;ont, 



CLOLDS lOR ME 



I NEVER KNEW VOL.... 



REVIEMIiTRLD 



,ADV TAID 



A RLfRIAL TOR Mi'. WON't T.L ( 

'I ho(:(;h CiiRisi alriadv tai 
And m^ mortal |o^s ot this 
I Ilar this si,ni)Lrs or in tlrc 

'I'llTS IS A TR\ ONE SA\'E ONI. T. 
I'OR Ml. Till'. 'THRONE TOR ML I.' 
I')l 'T SINCl. ^Ol'rI. on Till. WA 
Do Ml'. THIS T.WOR 



I (HOSE TO SETTLE FOR THE DIFFEKENCE 
1.1. lURN ,\l.l\ T W nil .ML IN ( INDERS 



IN TLRCI.SSION 



Rl. ON Till. \\■A^ 



I'>1.( \l SI, ^()l III'., 

^oi SI',l. ,\ii. 
Vol know \\i. 



OCEANIC 



I D SUNK INTO YOUR 

COLD DEEP. 

BECOME A BOTTOM FEEDER. 

CONTENT TO SQUEEZE NOURISHMENT 

FROM OTHERS DROPPINGS. 

TRYING VAINLY TO SUSTAIN LIFE 

ON THE LEl^OVER PARTS OF YOU 

AFFER you'd GIVEN THE HEALTHIER PARTS 

TO SO MANY OTHERS. 



I WAS DROWNING MYSELF 

ON THE FLOOR OF OUR OCEAN LUST. 

CREATING SEAWEED CHAINS! 

KELP KNOTS IN EACH LOC. 

I couldn't surface if I WANTED TO. 



I WATCHED THE UNDERSIDE 

OF SO MANY lovers' BOATS. 

FELT THE PRESSURE OF ACCEPTING 

FAR TOO MUCH, FOR FAR TOO LONG. 

OPENING MY LUNGS TO THE LIES 
YOU TAU(;HT me, felt the DECEIT 
SLIDE IN - COOL AND SUFFOCATING. 



Its funny 

'cuz even the smallest wishing well is proof in our societies 

believe that 

a little change.... can make a little change 

that just proves that there are people out there that dream 

just the way i do 

....i was four when i first came to america || 

not fully aware that i had just landed in the land in the land 

of opportunity k i 

where opportunists take advantage of their vantage point i 

those who got to see life from the right angle 

never had to act acute 

because they always had a shot at more degrees then we did 

SEE iVe SEEN THE SIGNS - ; 

AND IT SEEMS LIKE WeVe BEEN ABANDONED '■ 

...SO SOMETIMES I JUST WANNA' DRIVE fl 

ROLL UP MY WINDOWS AND TRY TO FORGEilBOUT LIFE S HIGH 

EXPECTATION . * ' ^m 

AND THATS WHY I DON't LOOK DOWN ON MY BROTHERS ^ 

WHO HAVE THAT DRIVE 

TO ROLL UP LIKE WINDOWS , ' 

AND GET HIGHER THAN EXPECTATION ; 

BECAUSE ITS HARD DOWN HERE 

SEE WE THE PEOPLE ^^ 

REALLY AINT PEOPLE NO MORE 

BUT MORE LIKE A FORM OF CURRENCY 

AND CURRENTLY j 

we're PAYING INTEREST FOR OUR VERY EXISTENCE 

IT doesn't matter of our President is black | 

IF OUR COUNTRY IS NOTHING MORE THAN SOME RED STATED AND BLUl 

STATED ^ 

AND MONEY IS STILL GREEN 

AND GREED STILL RUNS THROUGH THE VEINS OF HOUR SOCIETY 

IT doesn't matter if CNN BROADCAST LIVE 




J 11 DOESN V MAi 1 EK 1 

ERMAINE 



IF LIBERTY IS JUS r AS DEAD AS THK PRESIDENTS THAT LIKE THE 

p()CKi:rs 

OF CORPORA FL "fA F CA'FS" 

1 HA'F SA F BACK AND VVA FCLI OUR BROTHERS AND SISTERS 

STARVE AFFER KaTRINA HIT , 

this country is beinc; rand by blood stained benjies 

I'm talkinc; about Franklins 

AND FRANKIA' I COULDN't FATHOM OUR FOUR-FATHERS 
LOOKINC; FURFHER IN FO FIIE FUTURE AND SEEING HOW 

FAR we've fallen ^' 

SOMEONE TELL ME 

WHA'F IS FREEDOM WHEN YOUNG BOYS AINT NOTHING MORE 
THAN WALKINC; CORPSES 
AND INNER CIFY S'FREETS 
SOUND LIKE (;RAVEYARD FO MOTHER FORTUNATE ENOUGH 

TO PLAN FHEIR CHILD FUNERAL 

Is FHis FIIE "American Dream"? 

MY^W LUCKY ARE WE FO FIIE STATS STACKED IN OUR 

OPl%SniON 

MAYBE IF POLITICIANS WOULD STOP AND LISTEN 

THE THE CRIES TIIA'F LIE BENEATH THE LOWER CLASS 

THEY MAYBE THEY CAN LEARN TO SEE THE CEMETERY BETWEEN 



AND THEM 

LIKE.... 

THOSE ARE YOUR SUNS ON THE CORNER 

THOSE ARE YOUR DAUCJUTERS ON THE POLE 

WHILE YOU MAKE IT RAIN CUZ LIFE MADE HER POOR 

THESE ARE YOUR CHILDREN ON THOSE INNER CITY BLOCKS 



SHAPED UK&^T( 



STONES 



WITH HEART^'TOffi WISHING WELLS 

STILL LOOKING 

FOR A LITTLE CHANGE 




Alveranga 



AS THE SOUL MATES. 

WE CURLED UP IN A CORNER BIG ENOUGH FOR THE BOTH OF US. PRESSED OURSELVES CLOSE TO 

EACH OTHERS AUDIO. AND WHISPERED. 

SOULMATE. 

YOU MAKE EVERYTHING. 



EXIST. 

THE DUST AND THE ABYSS IS IN YOUR EYES. 

AND YOUR IN MY EYE (time). 

OH AM I UNWORTHY OF THEE. 

BUT STILL HE LET US BE. 

TOOK TURNS WRITING POEMS ON EAR LOBES AND BOTTOM LIPS.XO LINES SKIPPED ALL LINES 

MADE WITH EACH SCRIPT.I READ YOUR SCRIPTURE LIKE STUDY. HEARD THY \\'ORDS ECHO LIKE 

HEAVY.PRESSED MY HEAD AGAINST YOUR FORE TO PRAY FOR MORE TIME WITH \OU. PRATED L\ 

THAT CORNER WITH YOU. QUOTED SCRIPTURE OF Re\ ELATION IN THAT S^f' E^^H "^OU. 

WHISPERED. r ^ 

SOULMATE. 

DONT YOU THINK WE. 

EXIST. 

THE DUST AND THE ABYSS IS IN OUR EYES. 

AND YOUR IN MY TIMe(eYe) , 

OH AM I UNWORTHY TO SPEAK. 

BUT STILL ITS OUR PRAYERS HE SEEKS. 

DREW DIAGRAMS OF SEX AND SCIENCE ON WALL PAPER. CALLED IT THE MATH OF CREATIOX. 

WROTE OUR NAMES AND GUESSED WHAT THEY MEAN I.\ 1 HEIR XA'JIVE TON CLE IX BEIW'EEX 

THE SHADOWS OF OUR TEMPLES. YOU REACHED FOR MY RIGHT IIAXD. S'JEXCILED Y()\R IDEA 

OF WHAT IT MEANT TO YOU IN MY VEINS... TRACINfx LIKE A CCRIOIS CHILD. ^-OIR E\ES WEHE 

MILD. LIKE BAMBOO IN THE WILD. TOUCHED MY SIKMLDER TRAVELED M^' COLLAR. WHISPERED 

FOR HOURS. ..^^ ' 

SOULMATE. -'^'^^^^\- 

THE WORLD IS NOT OURS. ^ * !^^^" 

EXISTENCE IS SHORT. » ~ 

AND THE DUST COMES WHEN THE ABYSS FADES FRCIVI J IIESE E^ES. ^, 

CAN I HAVE YOU HERE IN MINe(eYe)(tIMe)? ^dk 

FOREVER... UNTIL THE END PEAKS. SPEAKS. ',, ^M 

AND HE STILL LETS US THINK IN WAYS. 



SO LETS PRAY, FOR NOT IN VAIN, FOR ETERNITY TO Hi: SA\ I D //l.i^ipgP^^YOURS MAKES 
MINE FEEL BOLD.THE HALF TO THE WHOLE.IN ME AS I IK SHALL ABIDE IN OUR ABODES. 
ECHO LIKE A WHISPER. CLOSE IN THIS SPACE LIKE \\ IX J I.R. ^" '^ '^^ "■ 

CUDDLEDINACORNER. 
AHMEN. . ., 



AS THE SOUL MATES 



E0LEN6 (5c UNIVERSITY CHOIR 



Of fled Choice of OakwoOiiUnwerelty 



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The 911 Reporters hail from Huntsville 
■Alabama. Conslsting of five members 

DaRH S "iJlJ MaIOM:, UKlMSyJASON 

Si.i.li:ks, Kkvs, Andri: W'ai.don, 
Pkrcmssion AM) I.vuK'isi , Kkic Kami?, 
Bass (Ji iiar, and Kavikkon Pkahson, 

KlA 1 AH. 



AKWOOD HAS HAD THE PLEASURE OF WATCHING THIS GROUP GROW, 
LITERALY FROM AN IDEA, INTO A FULL ON PROJECT. We ARE APART OF THEIR 
STORY IN MANYWAYS. No ONE WOULD BE SURPRISED IF ANY TIME SOON WE 
SAW OUR FRIENDS ON TV WINNING SOME MUSIC CONTEST OR AWARD AS SEEMS 
TO BE A GROWING FAD FOR OUR ALUMNI. FEBRUARY I4, 2012, THE REPORTERS 
GAVE US ALL SOME MUCH NEEDED LOVE IN THE FORM OF THEIR SECOND EP 

ENTITLED Until Tomorrow. 



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,<i*«B!#!Si*t»«:, 



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While they are all individually talented, as a group they have 
found a refreshing way to highlight and merge each one of their 

TALENTS INTO ONE COLLECTIVE SOUND THAT IS BOTH INTRIGUING AND 
ADDICTIVE. A FIRST LISTEN TO THEIR MUSIC WOULD UNDOUBTEDLY PROVE THE 
BANDS ABILITY TO GET YOU ON YOUR FEET DANCING, BUT THEY HAVE A SECRET 
WEAPON OF BEING ABLE TO EVOKE STRONG PURE EMOTION WITHIN THEIR 
LISTENERS. OnE PERFORMANCE AND YOU'rE HOOKED. OnE YEAR SINCE THEIR 
HUMBLE BEGGINGINGS AND ALL ANYONE WANTS IS MORE. 



tSfV 



Photographs By: Aaron I. 



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COMMITTED 

Still Melting Americas Hearts 

2011 Winner's OF The, Sing Off 



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Bringing Home The Gospel 



20 1 1 WINNER OF SUNDAYS BeST 

•J.()ll WIXM.K (JJ M \i).\ 



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"lI.J^iJ^J^KFUL, GRATEFUL AND 
,LESSED TO HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY' TO 
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AEOLIENS 

Giving Music To The World 



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Ansel Adams 



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LOVE AISP^REMELATION." 

Ansel Adams 



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RMiUATES 





: Antoynae Adams 



Jeffrey Aguy 



Andre Allicock 



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King Amos 



Daryl Anderson 







Jasmine Anderson 



Alexandra Arnold 



Andre Artis 




Joshua Asamoa 



Batiste Ashley 



KiRLiA Augustine 



Elizabeth Bailey 



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Amber Batten 



Kara Baxter 



Michael Bennett 



Stefani Black 




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Ashley Booker 



Olinfra Brathvvaite 



Jayson Brown 



Emekvv Buffong 




Kellee Burrell 



'mm' 

Sheereen Burton 




CiiLOE Buxton 



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AsHiXE Byers 



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Martine Cadet 



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Deshay Caines 



Stephanie Campbell 




Andrea Carter 




J KSSICA C ARl'WRIGI IT 



Taina Casimir 



Ryan Cephas 



AucE Charitable 



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Patricia Charitable 



Jennifer Charles 



Amber Cheatham 



Joseph Chetram 



vV iLSON Chloe 








Kristina Christian 



De' Onna Clark 



Christopher Coke 








Christina Cooper 



Stalon Cuffie 



Katiana Damus 



Stewart David 





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Ashanti Davis 



Justin Davis 



Lauren Davis 



Marlon Davis 



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Kuis'i'iNA Dksix 



Vankssa Diambois 



Brandon Dixon 



Raphael Doiiolas 





Desiuke Dovley 



Alex Dumas 



LoKA Kbere 



Emanuel Edwards 



ClIlNYERE EN(;EISH 




QUENTIN E\'ERETr 



DixviN Ferris 



1 ROY TRVNCIS 




Ks TEl'l I A FUANC'ISQl l E 



FlRMA FrANCISQUE 



Shaneui: Fretf 



Erica (iabriei. 



TES 2 





Jason Garneit 



Jewell George 



Jacky Georges 



Gladys Gill 




Taeisha Graham 





Tashauna Graham 



Ashley Grant 



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Melinda Graves 






Adrienne Green 



Lindsi Green 



Lawrence Guy. 



GuRMU Habtamu 




Shannon Hardy 



Jason Harewood 



Ti.&>s 



Jenna Harris-Hughes 



Jaquese Hawkins 




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Rkanne Hazelwood 




AisiiA Hunt 



Brianna Jacob 



Akevla Henry 



Teoean Hunter 



PASCHAl.JElTa-.RY 



Patricia Henry 



Vankssa Hi:dsox 



CiiARDE Hurst 



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Arditii Imak.\ndo 




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Junior JEUNE 



AiiuiwiN Johnson 




KvuA Johnson 



MichaelJohnson 



MoNiQi'E Johnson Mt>NiQit>JoiJciAjt)nNsoN 






Shalonta Jolivette 



Jalissa Joseph 



Shantel Joseph 






JamishaJosiah 



RushelleJulien 



Kulule Kenea 



Brenda Ivessio 





Katisha King 



Pailah-Meg Kolleh 



Dionne La Touche 



Demaria Laforte 




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TiANNA Lewis 



ASHANTE~ LUCOMBE 



Tara Malcolm 




Stephen Manders 






Richard Makiin 



Roiu'.UT Mavaka 



KaIIMYA MCALIMN 



An roNio Mckaddkn 





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Marcus Mcintyri: 



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CaMILLE MlTCllEIi. 



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Terry-Ann Montaque 



Kjmiko Moore 



Janeen Morgan 







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Elena O'Reggio 



Carl Okumu-Camerra 



James Partlovv 







Tamra Pascall 



Sh AVLA Pi:dersi:n-Bi ick 



EuiCA Pelotf, 



Alesia Perkins 






Briitney Perry 



Emmanuel Phaeton 



RoBEST Preval 



Jerrvi. Pridgett 






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Rayne~ Provost 




ToNH A Rankin 



Jasmine Reedus 






OcTAVirs Reese 



Kristin Rhamie 



Marquh A Richardson 



Amor Royer 



Micusse Saimpiiar 



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Fara Saious 






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Kevin Saint-Elie 




LywvRENCE Saunders 




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Kevin-Lee Scon^ 


Mason Shariece 









Latva Simmons 



Spencer Sims 



Heloise Smith 



Tearsa Smith 



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Vincent Spellman 



GooDSON Stephen 



Bryant Stewart 



Cassandralee Stewart 



Alisha Strayhorn 



Michael Strayhorn 




Gholston Tamara 



April Taylor 






Ariel Taylor 



Jasmine Taylor 



Eunice Thegdor 



AuNx Thermidor 





Darnisiia 1 homas 



Olivia Thomas 



Kecha Thornton 



Lee Tiffany 




Keith Tobias 



Cynthia Traughber 



Emca Tross 



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Kevin Vacciana 



Krystal Vanhorne 



Jerrell Walker 



Alexandria Walton 



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Margaret Ward 



NicoiSE Waring 



Jarrod Webb 



Zachary Weems 






DWAYNE WeSCOM 



KoRNELiA White 



Malcolm White 



ASHLIE VV ILLIAMS 








Gaillynn Williams 



Natalie Williams 





Samuel Williams 



Marie Woodson 




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MiciiAL Wright 



Travis Wric;ht 



Jacci CLemons 



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Faculty & Staff 




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Reginald Abernathy 
Karen Anderson 
Linda Anderson 



Lydia Andrews s;-^ 



Tangy Armstrong 
George Ashley 
Calista Augusta 
Juliet Bailey-Peiirod •" 



Patricia Barnes 

Jorge Bartholomew 

Miriam Battles 

Talia Berryhill 



Olivia Be\ eri y 

Carole Boom 

Derek Bow i 

Charolette Br\m) 



Theodore Brown Sk 

Wayne Bucknor 

Francisco Burgos 

James Butler 





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Jason Ferdinand 

Denise Finley 

Flora Flood 

Kevin Ford 



April Fortune 

Lorry'iine Frye 

Cherryl Galley 

Walter Getfield 



Lela Gooding 

Elaine Gr.\y 

Lillian Green 

Alfonso Green Jr. 



Jeneen Gresham 

Ethel Griffin 

Safawo Gullo 

Melonie Gurley 



Melvin Harris 

John Hill 

Martin Hodnett 

Francis Hughes 





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Sill II A.Jackson 
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Sandra Jkan 

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Henrifii A Lmhon 

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Veronica Leftridge 

Samuel London 

Wanda Lott 

Florence Marchand 



Chlck May 

James Mbyinkir\ 
Timothy Mcclurf 
Jason Mccracken 



Timothy Mcdonald 

Steven Mc\\'illiams 

Wilson Miles 

Elizabeth Mosby 



Janis Newborn 

Belita Newby 

Phillip Nixon 

Sonia Paul 



Kerth Payne 

Adriana Perera 

Janet Poles 




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TAFF 



Cecil Spence 

Deon Spencer 

Maurice Staples 

I\T Starks 



Patricia Stewart 

Barbara Stovall 

Gloria Supelveda 

Geraldine Thompson 



Shelley Vaughn 
Alexander Volko\' 
Mer\tn Warren i«?, 
Howard Weems 



1v\ren White 

Lisa Williams 

Rachel \\'illiams-Smith 

Jesse Wilson 



Monica Wilson 

Paula Wilson 

Wilson 

Vaughn ^^"ooDSON 





SWUKA W'l'lMIl 

\'i,i<M.K 1. \\i<ir,ill 

A.MJKI.U Vol Nf/ 

1'aka \'(M N(, 



YOU WILL BE 
MISSED 




J. 




Your Garwood Family 



Justin deactivated his facebook only days before he died. Rendering the i-earbook unable to 
find any decent pictures of him. for this i am personally sorry. 

Your Editor 




To MY FELLOW STUDENTS, 

OaKWOOD UnIVERSITT LS saddened greatly, as Hl'NTSVILLI: I loSPITAL HAS 
CONFIRMED THAtJuSTIN HaNNA, AN 18-YEAR OLD FRESHMAN, DIED LA IK 11 IIS 

Friday afternoon, March 23, 2012, from a drowning accident ai \miai 

IS COMMONLY KNOWN AS "tHE ROCK QUARRY," A PROPERTY OWNED BY 

Oakwood University', but on a long-term lease to an outside company. 
Although we are the largest that Oakwood has ever been, with more 

than 2,000 STUDENTS, AT THE END OF THE DAY, WE ARE VERY MUCH A SMALL 
FAMILY WITH NATIONAL/iNTERNATIONAL SIBLINGS, AND WE FEEL E\ ERY SIX(;LE 
ONE OF EACH OTHER's CUTS AND BRUISES AND EVERY SINGLE TEAR. We ARE 
STILL REELING FROM THE SHOCK OF JuSTIN's DEATH, JUST HOURS AC;0, AND YET, 

THE Bible teaches us that our hope and faith must transcend the 

TEMPORARY TEARS AND GRAVE SITE. We WILL AND NEED TO GRIE\'E - W e'\ E (iO 1 
ONE LESS SOLDIER ON THE BATTLEFIELD; BUT WE MUST NOW BECilX THE SE.\RCH 
AND ASK, 'who NOW WILL STEP FORWARD, AND RUN THE RACE OF OUR JUST- 
FALLEN COMRADE-IN-ARMS?' ThAT's HOW WE CAN BEST HONOR JuSTIN's LE(;aCY. 

God bless 

Nelson N. Pugh, Jr. 

President 

United Student Movement 






mm 


Us*-* 

i 


K|U 


■1 


■1 



("wm 



. HERE ARE SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES, SO MANY POSSIBILITIES THAT THE 
YEARBOOK OFFERS. AlL IT TAKES IS FOR PEOPLE TO SEE IT, AND THEN DEDICATE 
THEMSEL\'ES TO MAKING THOSE IDEAS COME TO LIFE. ThATS M^HAT THE 
YEARBOOK TRITLY NEEDS, PEOPLE \\ HO ARE DEDICATED TO FINDING THAT THING 
NO ONE HAS THOITGHT TO DO THAT \MLL MAKE THE YEARBOOK JLST THAT MUCH 
BETTER. It REQlilRES DEDICATION. If IT ^^'ERE NOT FOR A FE\\^ CLOSE FRIENDS I 
WOIT.D HA^ E DONE THIS YEARBOOK ENTIRELY BY MYSELF. I SEE THAT AS A 
TRAGEDY. ThERE ARE SO MANY POINTS OF VIE\\^ SO MANY DIFFERENT EYES 
EXPERIENCING ^'ARIOlIS THINGS HERE AT OAK^^ OOD. ThE TRAGEDY IS THIS BOOK 
A\AS MOLDED AND SHAPED PRIMARILY THROITGH MY EYES, OUT OF THOUSANDS 
HERE TO AMTNESS THE HISTORY WE HA^E ALL MADE TOGETHER. I HOPE THIS 
NOTE REACHES SOME OF YOU AND YOU'lL FIND THE DESIRE TO MAKE SOMETHING 
(;REAT, to share and record an experience FOR YOUR FELLOW STITDENTS , 
THAT WILL LAST FORFAER. I HAD THE PRR'ILECiE OF DOING THAT FOR YOli THIS 
YEAR ;VND I HOPE YOl' ENJOY AND/oR APPRECIATE THE \\X:)RK I PliT INTO IT. It IS 
FOR YOU AFFER ALL. 



^^A 



JlTJA PhIPPS 

20II-20I2 Yearbook Editor n Chief 



Special thanks to Dawn Peters and Gre(;okv Roper who where \'ery 

CLUTCH THLS year, I LITERALLY WOULD NOT HAVE BEEEN ABLE TO EINLSH THIS 

WITHOUT THEM. Erica Gabriel, Jasmine Anderson, Taina Caslmir, 
Stephanie Campbell and Adrienne Green were extremely helpful at 
different times. Always willing althoucjh not always able. lol. Finally 
to Jordan Ways, Paul Gaiter, Dre' Waldon, Alan Woodson and Imani 
Mutton they didn't really do much to help but they were always there 
entertaining me in my office, making me life, playing good music and 

HAVING epic dance PARTIES. FOR ALL THESE PEOPLE I AM SENCERELY GREATKl'L. 



Writers 

Adrienne Green 
Taina Casimir 
Te'Mar Ellis 
Betty Mgombo 
JouRDAN Ways 



Photographers 

Henry Chaney 
Dawn Peters 
Greogory Roper 
Maatther Morgan 
Jasmine Anderson 



Layout 

Erica Gabriel 
Adrienne Green 
Bett\' Mgombo 
Jasmine Anderson 



'^ 4C 




I 




w * 



Ashby 
Auditiorii 



WM|Mfl<wiM« 




K^fjIk^M" •V' J '^^ 





SJf^'^J'/r'V^'-- ■'- "' 



ColdphM 



The 2012 Acorn, Volume 59, was published by the United Student Movement at 
Oakwood University and printed by Walsworth Publishing Company. 

Publication: 

Copy Count: 1400 
Page Count: 224 
Size: 7 3/4 X 10 1/2 

Typography: 

Fonts: 

AWPCBaxter 

AWPCBria 

AWPCDesignOnline 

AWPCLubahnGraph 

AWPCLunchbox 

AWPCMineru 

AWPCOliveOil 

AWPCAmericanTypewriter 

Photography: 

Student Portraits taken by Byron Philips 

Photographer, Huntsville, AL. 

All other photographs were taken by 

Oakwood University Acorn staff 

photographers. 

Production: 

The 2012 Acorn was produced using 
Walsworth's Online Design on various 
computers. 



224 



The Acorn is a student publication that is the the official yearbook of Oakwood 
University. The editorial content does not necessarily reflect the views and stance of 
the university. 

Acorn Yearbook 
Oakwood University 
7000 Adventist Blvd 
Ford Hall Rm. 204 
Huntsville, AL 35896 

Copyright 20 1 1 , the Acorn Staff, USM and Oakwood University. All rights reserved. 

Walswnrth^